Reaching for the stars: marketing tips from NASA

Reaching for the stars: marketing tips from NASA

Not since we landed on the moon have I seen so much hype around a celestial event. It’s rather exciting actually and oh so appropriate for the solar season of Sagittarius we are now in—when the energies highlight our need to expand our horizons. Props to NASA’s marketing, PR and social media teams for pulling out all of the stops on this week’s comet ISON perihelion. Take a look at how this one event is being used to tell the organization’s story: Separate event landing page to watch live coverage that highlights solar satellite viewing capabilities A full court media blitz that includes a special PBS presentation  and numerous press mentions across national media to position NASA scientists as thought leaders A Google+ hangout to discuss the event with their fans A special hashtag on Twitter to segment the event from the main twitter site and Facebook  posts to continue the conversation Without huge budgets for promotion, NASA is genius at social media. (would you expect any less?) I think a lot of us can learn from their process. Check out this Inside Social Media podcast with John Yembrick, NASA’s Head of Social Media on how he manages all of the content he has to work with, and the trends he thinks will drive stronger interaction with your audience. At the bottom of the interview page are some excellent tips on how to look at social media, choose the right channels for your content and measure your results. There’s optimistic, expansive energy at your disposal this week. The time is right to consider how you reach your audience to tell your story … and decide whether or not some expansion is in order.   Image Credit: Adam Block/Mount Lemmon SkyCenter/University of...

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The downside of frequent flyer miles

The downside of frequent flyer miles

I used to be jealous of the folks boarding a plane first because of their elite status for traveling a gazillion miles a year. I really didn’t want to travel that much to achieve the status. I just wanted to be one of the first people on the plane. But now I have another reason to feel badly for anyone who spends the majority of their month traveling to see customers. NASA just published a video and online article about a less-than-public fact of frequent flying that will make you rethink the value of your rewards. Especially if you travel internationally. According to the article, “A 100,000 mile frequent flyer gets about 20 chest x-rays, points out Chris Mertens, a senior research scientist at NASA Langley Research Center. This is true regardless of the latitude of the flights.” If you want to check currents on radiation levels before you fly, the NAIRAS website has real-time radiation levels for flights here. YIKES! Throw in the TSA body scanners you have to pass through just to get on the plane, and you might want to rethink your travel-day attire.  I see a whole new consumer product line opportunity for the manufacturers of lead aprons. And another reason to replace face-to-face visits with well-constructed online video or webinar meetings when you...

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